Dog Training 

Three things every dog ​​wants you to know

Whether you are raising a dog, ten dogs, or just an aspiring pet parent, these three tips will help you understand canine friends and keep them working hard.

X and O

The history of embracing is completely human. Like humans, dogs are eager to touch and love. Unlike humans, dogs are not the same as warm hugs and tight love. For most dogs, a hug is like a confusing trap. What we don’t know is that our dog may be thinking: Why is this person squeezing me? Ouch! It hurts! Or how can I get rid of it?

To avoid putting any dog ​​in an uncomfortable or confusing situation, skip the hugs, scratch under your chin, put a soft pet behind your ears, or wipe your belly.

Not all dogs think, feel or act in the same way. If you have a hug dog, go for it! Remember, just because your dog likes your hug does not mean they want a stranger’s hug. Preventing children or guests from hugging dogs is the best way to keep everyone (including Fido) safe and happy.

Brain game

Physical exercise is a key factor in longevity and health for you and your dog. Sometimes nature hinders us from outdoor adventures. Fortunately for us, exercising your dog’s mind is as exhausting as exercising their body.

Playing games such as finding games and roulette, or simply teaching a dog a new technique, is a great way to stimulate their mind and body. Playing brain games with your dog can reduce stress and is fun for everyone!

Not in the mood to play games? Educational toys and bone toys are another good way to keep your dog mentally engaged.

Fido says

Just because your dog is barking at someone or another dog does not mean that they are showing aggressive or harmful intent.

In the dog world, not all bark is the same. Similar to how humans manipulate tone and volume, dogs can also change their bark to express different meanings. “Dogs may be able to subtly change their voices to produce a variety of different sounds that may have different meanings. Dogs may even change their sounds in ways that are not obvious to other dogs but to humans” (scientificamerican.com)

Since we don’t yet know what dogs are saying, studying dogs’ body language is a good way to get clues about how they feel and try to communicate.

THANKS for reading, please click here for more information.

Related posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.