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How to protect a dog: Age-appropriate dog duties for children and adolescents

Is the owner of the dog educating children to take responsibility is a great way to give them the joy of love and devotion that has been completely taken back from their fearful partner!

There are many things that children and young people can do to help keep a family dog ​​that doesn’t really feel like a home. However, if you realize that older children are not motivated to do the tasks, offering them extra pocket money is usually a good incentive (although you may not need it). Spent a lot of money)!

We’ve put together a guide that makes dog care jobs suitable for kids of all ages. Why not sit down with your kids and talk to them about what tasks would be best for them?

Don’t forget, caring for your puppy every day is an essential “job” that needs to be done by someone!

Up to 2 years

Even the tiniest tattoos don’t want to be left out when it comes to caring for their beloved Ferrari friend! And getting a small child accustomed to being around your dog will help your youngster develop an age-old love for animals.

With that said, we usually offer to introduce your kids in a controlled environment. Some dogs are tolerant of children and some dogs are not. You should never leave your baby unattended with your dog, and slowly introduce them to each other.


Two to four years

  • At this age, learning to keep a dog safe is your child’s first job.
  • Young babies crawl into the pet, especially her fur and tail, which is not happy for your student and may hurt for your baby!
  • Show your child how Gently Feed your dog, while keeping their fingers free from sensitive areas such as your little eyes, ears, mouth and bottom!
  • Now that your child is learning to talk, another “job” for them is to learn how to name their dog.

Fourth age

  • By the age of four, your child should know how to keep a family dog ​​safe. Encourage your child to use the dog’s name as well.
  • Now, you might want to teach your child how to brush a dog, always under close supervision and very gently.
  • Let your baby dog ​​drop to the floor and let the dog pick it up.

Five years old

  • At five years old, you can train your child on how to keep their dog moving while keeping his feet. Don’t let your child still hide by themselves! Why not take a nap with the extra lap that your baby can hold both as your dog does?
  • Your dog loves behaviors! Train your child how to treat a dog safely, using a flat, open hand.
  • Let your child brush your dog for a few minutes to help you.
  • Encourage your child to take care of your dog every day.

Six years old

  • By the age of six, your child will be able to call your dog by name. Now you can train your child on the commands you use with the dog such as “sit” and “stay”. Make sure to organize the process closely so that no party gets confused and frustrated!
  • Your child can enjoy supervised play sessions with your dog. Bringing the game is always there A good game Getting Started!
  • Allow your child to brush their dog, keeping a close eye on them from a distance.
  • Your six-year-old can help your dog run in the same lash, using the extra loop we mentioned earlier.
  • Encourage your child to spend time playing ball or goal with your dog.
  • Allow your child to focus on the dog, give the dog medicine. Make sure you stay close in case of problems.
  • Show your child how to practice simple tricks with a dog, including “hands-on”!
  • Your child can now keep a pet dog every day.

Seven and eight years old

  • Children between the ages of seven and eight should be able to take care of the dog under their supervision, provided the dog is small or behaves very well. Allow your child to practice his movements with the dog in an enclosed space.
  • Non-sporting sports sessions in a safe enclosed area may be appropriate.
  • Your baby can now keep a pet dog every day.
  • Allow your child to brush the dog but stay close to make sure they can handle the task on their own.
  • Let your baby dog ​​use the open hand. Be sure to stay close in case of problems.
  • Now your child can practice simple tricks with your dog, including “hands-on”.
  • Show your child how to “bring” play with your dog. For example, play a goal or dog game for your toddler and encourage him to get it back.
  • Teach your child all the commands your dog knows, for example, “sit,” “stay,” and “sniff.” Be sure to watch your child practice when he gives these commands to your dog!

Nine and ten years old

  • Children between the ages of nine and ten can take on a little more responsibility. You can teach your children about dog food and water needs. Show it to your kids your dog eats, as much as he was fed, and when he was fed.
  • Under supervision, allow your child to prepare your dog food.
  • Your baby can pour fresh water for your dog every day, remember to clean the water bowl first.
  • A good job that your kids can do with minimal supervision is washing dog dishes and cleaning your toddler’s eating area.
  • Daily Grease like dough Can be assigned to your child.
  • Daily coloring is also an “assumption” that your child can now mess up.
  • If you have a small, well-behaved dog, your baby can now hold him on his feet for a short time.
  • Your child can reward your dog with behaviors.
  • The daily gait practice session is a great pastime for the dog and the driver!
  • Your child can now play with your dog, including “bring” and hide.
  • Your child may now spend time with your dog practicing familiar commands, including “sit down,” “stay,” and “down.”
  • When it’s bath time for your baby, you can show your baby how to give your dog shampoo and set!

Emphasize the importance of keeping soap and water away from the dog’s face, and emphasize why it is important to remove all shampoo to prevent your dog’s skin from becoming itchy and dry. Explain why proper dog shampoo should always be used for your pet bath, not from human shampoo or dish soap.


Eleven years old

  • By the age of 11, babies should be able to provide your dog with daily food and wash his or her unclean food with minimal supervision.
  • Now, it’s time for your child to learn some new tricks for the dog. You may need to help them so your dog doesn’t get messed up!
  • Your baby can pour fresh water for your dog every day, remember to clean the water bowl.
  • Your baby can have your puppy every day if needed.
  • Daily coloring is also a “duty” that your child can do.
  • If you have a small, well-behaved dog, your child can catch him for a short trip.
  • Treat the dog a bit.
  • Practice walking with your dog.
  • Play with your dog, including searching for “bring” and hide.
  • Take time with your dog to practice familiar commands, including “sit down,” “stay,” and “down”.
  • Help you bathe your dog when needed

Twelve years old

  • Educate your child about the health signs in their dog and explain the importance of annual vaccinations. When your toddler has pockets, take your baby with you to the veterinarian.
  • A trip to the veterinarian for your dog is usually the most exciting for children. Get your kids to ask the veterinarian any questions about your dog’s health and how to protect him.
  • Show your child how to give your dog a daily basic health check.
  • Prepare your dog’s daily food and clean the dishes with minimal supervision.
  • Spend some time each day teaching your dog a few new tricks. Make sure you have access to help in case of need.
  • Pour fresh water for your dog every day, remember to clean the water bowl.
  • Take your dog out every day if needed.
  • Daily coloring is also a “duty” that your child can do.
  • Put your dog on those legs for a short time.
  • Treat your dog a bit.
  • Practice walking with your dog.
  • Play with your dog, including searching for “bring” and hide.
  • Take time with your dog to practice familiar commands, including “sit,” “stay,” and “down”.
  • Your baby can now help you bathe your dog when needed.
  • If your dog goes to obedience classes, take your child with you and show him or her how to help.

Thirteen and fourteen years old

Here are a few dogs watching tasks that your child should be able to perform, including:

  • Get your dog a first week’s health check.
  • Prepare your dog’s daily food and cook without supervision.
  • Drain fresh water for the dog every day, remember to clean the water bag.
  • Train your dog every day if needed.
  • Feeding your dog every day.
  • The dog pulled out to move its legs.
  • Treat your dog a bit.
  • Teach your dog new tricks.
  • Practice walking with your dog.
  • Playing with your dog, including searching for “bring” and hide.
  • Spend time with your dog practicing familiar commands, including “sit down,” “stay,” and “down”.
  • Helping you bathe your dog when needed.
  • Attend obedience classes with you and your dog.
  • Dog hair removal.
  • Prepare your dog.
  • Brushing your dog’s teeth (under supervision).
  • Veterinary elections when requested to do the same.

Fifteen years old

  • A 15-year-old should be able to have your dog lead them on their own. This includes following the dog and understanding how to deal with the dog safely and responsibly.

Other tasks that your 15-year-old can do are as follows:

  • Get your dog a first week’s health check.
  • Prepare your dog’s daily food and cook without supervision.
  • Drain fresh water for the dog every day, remember to clean the water bowl.
  • Train your dog every day if needed.
  • Feeding your dog every day.
  • The dog pulled out to move his legs.
  • Treat your dog a bit.
  • Teach your dog new tricks.
  • Practice walking with your dog.
  • Playing with your dog, including searching for “bring” and hide.
  • Spend time with your dog practicing familiar commands, including “sit down,” “stay,” and “down”.
  • Helping you bathe your dog when needed.
  • Attend obedience classes with you and your dog.
  • Dog hair removal.
  • Prepare your dog.
  • Brushing your dog’s teeth
  • Make veterinary choices when asked to do the same.

roll out

When it comes to dogs, be forever! Remember to do specific tasks such as packing nails must be administered by an adult.

You can help your parents by doing some of the tasks that are necessary to keep your little one happy and healthy. Be sure to sit down with the parents and check out this guide with them first!

Reminder to parents: For the safety and comfort of both baby and dog, always be sure to monitor young children when they are working or interfering with a family coach! Also, be sure to reward your child with pocket money for successfully and accurately performing dog tasks!

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